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Stanford University now has a Youtube channel, with free access to HD video of full courses on everything from dynamical systems to quantum entanglement. More conferences and workshops are videotaping their talks. What are videos online that you think everyone should know about?

I'll seed this with a few answers to presentations that are mostly expository, but what I'm hoping might happen is that this community wiki could turn into a resource to share excellent presentations of new research, as well as a place to learn (or reinforce) background in an unfamiliar area.

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34 Answers 34

Sipser gave a nice Clay Public Lecture on P vs. NP entitled "Beyond Computation"

http://www.claymath.org/public_lectures/sipser.php

and there is another one by Vijaya Ramachandra

http://claymath.msri.org/pversusnp.mov

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The archive of recorded seminars of the Perimeter Institute is both useful and entertaining.

The Qubit Lab is a Youtube channel that explains advanced topics on quantum information and computation at children level, but it's also very enjoyable if you are an adult.

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Original - Structure and Implementaion of Computer Programs (SICP) by Hal Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/classes/6.001/abelson-sussman-lectures/

If you have trouble with downloading all of the videos - you can dowload them from archive.org (on archive.org some links are not show up). http://jcubic.wordpress.com/2010/07/09/abelson-sussman/

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If you are interested in concurrency theory, programming languages or interactive theorem proving, I warmly recommend the videos of the recent Milner Symposium. For example J. Parrow's talk The pi-calculus: Origin and recent developments tells the beautiful story of the early development of $\pi$-calculus, and B. Pierce's talk Types à la Milner is a lucid overview of work on types for process calculi.

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protected by Kaveh May 10 '13 at 6:53

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