Computability theory a.k.a. recursion theory.

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Formalized priority argument

A priority argument, an important proof technique in recursion theory, was introduced by Friedberg and Muchnik, to solve Post's Problem, i.e., the existence of two r.e. sets that do not Turing reduce ...
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Is there any research on approximation of reals with computable numbers

I was wondering if there is any research in the field of Diophantine Approximation using the computable numbers. It seems to be a good fit, a dense countable set with a variety of different potential ...
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Turing degree of Solomonoff semi-measure

We define the Solomonoff semi-measure $m$ on finite strings $x$ by $$m(x) = \sum_{p: U(p) = x} 2^{-l(p)},$$ where $U$ is a universal prefix Turing machine, $U(p) = x$ means $U$ outputs $x$ on input ...
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Proof for Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable using reductions

I am looking for a proof that Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable using a reduction from another uncomputable problem. The common proof is a formalization of Berry's paradox rather than a reduction, ...
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What can you do with a moving knife besides cutting a cake?

In the fair cake-cutting, two different computational models are used: A discrete model, in which the algorithm issues queries to the players and proceeds according to their replies; A continuous ...
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Results about computability power or limitations of shared read/write registers

I want to know more results about the computability power or limitations of shared $\texttt{read/write}$ registers/objects in distributed/concurrent computing theory. Two typical examples are: [1]. ...
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Why study type theory?

After reading the literature on type theory (especially the constructive kind - CTT) I'm left wondering "why" should one study type theory, specifically within the confines of "computing" in general? ...
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Can differential equations be classed into their own complexity classes?

Problems have been, as a whole, classified, thanks to Computational Complexity. But, in differential equations, is it possible to classify differential equations depending on their computational ...
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703 views

What functions can System F not compute?

In this wikipedia article on Turing Completeness it states that: The untyped lambda calculus is Turing complete, but many typed lambda calculi, including System F, are not. The value of typed ...
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542 views

How exactly does lambda calculus capture the intuitive notion of computability?

I've been trying to wrap my head around the what, why and how of $\lambda$-calculus but I'm unable to come to grips with "why does it work"? "Intuitively" I get the computability model of Turing ...
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Was bombe machine turing complete?

In the recent movie called The Imitation Game, there is a affirmation that Turing was building his theoretical machine. That machine is the Bombe Machine. Is this machine really equivalent to a Turing ...
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Representation as sum of unit fractions: primitive recursive?

Consider the following ternary relation $R\subseteq\mathbb{N}^3$: $(p,q,m)\in R$ iff $p,q>0$ and there is a set $S\subseteq \{\frac{1}{n}:n\in\mathbb{N}, n\geq 1\}$ such that $|S|=m$ and ...
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Where can I find the proof of the theorem and what is the computational complexity of the computably isomorphic map?

"any two representations of reals which are acceptable are actually computably isomorphic",please see here for reference where may proof of this theorem be found, and what is the the computational ...
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Is it decidable that a computable analytic function over $\mathbb{R,C} ,$ equals $0$

Is it decidable whether a computable analytic function $f(x_1,x_2,\dots,x_n)$ over $\mathbb{R}$, $\mathbb{C}$ in a semi-algebraic or semi-analytic domain is identically zero? Is there any algorithm? ...
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How to judge the definition of computational complexity of reals is natural or suitable?

As we know, definition of computational complexity of algorithm is almost without controversy, but the definition of computational complexity of reals or the computation models over reals is not in ...
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463 views

Fixed points in computability and logic

This question has also been posted on Math.SE, http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1002540/fixed-points-in-computability-nd-logic I hope it is ok to also post it here. If not, or if it is too ...
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How high are the higher types that appear in practice?

This is admittedly a rather naively put and vague question, and I'm not sure how much more specific I want or can make it, but I'll try. By "practice" I mean surely in actual programming practice (of ...
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For a random oracle R, does BPP equal the set of computable languages in P^R?

Well, the title pretty much says it all. The interesting question above was asked by commenter Jay on my blog (see here and here). I'm guessing both that the answer is yes and that there's a ...
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Conflicting definitions regarding TM and Recursively Enumerable languages

In Lewis's and Papadimitriou's book "Elements of the Theory of Computation" the transition table is a function $\delta: Q \setminus F \times \Gamma \rightarrow Q \times (\Gamma \cup \{L,R\})$. ...
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Computability of infinite-dimensional vector space

So there is a talk about infinite-dimensional vector space being computable. But then I find it hard to understand. Apparently, dimension is infinite, so how would the operations of the space be ...
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What is necessary and/or sufficient requirement for a subring of a field to be computable? [closed]

As title asks, what is necessary and/or sufficient requirement for a subring of a field to be a computable ring? Conditions on either field or subring are fine.
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To what extent can the mathematics of Reals be applied to Computable Reals?

Is there a general theorem that would state, with proper sanitization, that most known results regarding the use of real numbers can actually be used when considering only computable reals? Or is ...
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Consistency and completeness of any arbitrary 3-valued logic? [closed]

Based on the explanations here [1] I know that 3-valued first order logic has many different versions, which differ in the definition of their operations (e.g. implication). All of these (as far as I ...
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Decidability of first-order theory of real closed fields with functions

By a famous theorem of Tarski, the first-order theory of real closed fields is decidable, as it admits quantifier elimination. Can this result be extended so that propositions can be quantified over ...
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Primitive Recursive Definition : Binary numbers

Usually primitive recursive functions are define from Zero, Identity and Successor, projectors, composition and recursion. But you obtain algorithms that works with unary numbers. For example, the ...
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How can you prove that all halting probabilites are normal real numbers?

Wikipedia claims that any halting probability (Chaitin's constant) is a normal number. Since Chaitin's constant is uncomputble, how is a proof the the normalcy of the number possible? Computable ...
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Does hyper-computational power of infinite time Turing machines also require infinite memory?

Can a infinite time Turing machine perform hyper-computation like checking the consistency of the set theory ZF without using infinite memory?
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A function is lambda-2-definable iff it is HG computable and provably type correct in lambda-PRED2

I'm having a problem regarding Theorem 5.4.40.3 of Barendregt's Lambda calculi with types (1992), a chapter in Handbook in logic in computer science. (I'm referring to the PostScript version available ...
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Jumping (Busy) Beaver variant

Is the following Busy Beaver variant known? A Universal Turing machine $J$, feeded with a description of a deterministic Turing machine $M_i$, starts simulating $M_i$ on inputs $x_j = 1,2,3,...$ for ...
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What is known about reduction by “$P_1$ interprets $P_2$” for generalized programming languages?

Inspired by this answer, let's say that a programming language is given by the data $L=(P,ev)$ where $P$ (the set of "valid programs") is a computable subset of $\Sigma^*$ and $ev$ (the "evaluator") ...
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979 views

A total language that only a Turing complete language can interpret

Any language which is not Turing complete can not write an interpreter for it self. I have no clue where I read that but I have seen it used a number of times. It seems like this gives rise to a kind ...
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Is it possible to determine if a reduction is correct?

Suppose we have an arbitrary term, x, in Lambda Calculus, or in an equivalent turing-complete system. Suppose we ask an oracle what is the normal form of that term, ...
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Can complexities differ w.r.t. different computational models?

I understand that a decision problem can be decidable with respect to certain computational models. For instance, the question whether an arbitrary sequence of parenthesis is balanced is undecidable ...
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How to translate general recursion into a set of $\mu$-recursive operator applications?

I'm trying to find a scheme to translate a functional language with let rec into a set of primitives called "generalized arrows", i.e. $\kappa$-calculus with ...
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Complexity of problems solvable by primitive recursion

I was wondering if there is any known complexity of problem for which primitive recursive functions cannot solve. One such problem might be "is N the ackermann function for $k_1$ $k_2$" as it seems ...
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Would it be possible for a compiler to convert a recursive sum into the average formula?

def sum1(n): if n==0: return 0 else: return n + sum1(n-1) def sum2(n): return n*(n+1)/2 A compiler can not convert ...
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Computing dual of the spectral norm of tensor of order 3

It is shown in http://www.stat.uchicago.edu/~lekheng/work/jacm.pdf that computing the spectral norm (see Definition 6.6) of a $3^{rd}$ order tensor $T \in \mathbb{R}^{d_1 \times d_2 \times d_3}$ is ...
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How useful is program search in the field of programming-language theory?

I've been thinking: computing systems such as the Lambda Calculus and its variations are usually very simple and can be implemented in as few as ~80 lines of Haskell code. There is a self-interpreter ...
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Is there any system where function equality (extensionality) is decidable?

Is there any programming language or system where function equality (extensionality) is decidable?
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How to introduce recursion to Simply Typed Lambda Calculus while at the same time keeping strong normalisation?

Suppose you have a version of the STLC with one base type, similar to: data Tree = Branch Tree Tree | Leaf Now, suppose you want to add recursion to that ...
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Is there a programming language where any arbitrary recursive function can be fused?

Compilers like GHC for Haskell use inlining as one of its most important optimising tools. Doing that is not possible for recursive functions, in general. A few techniques have been developed to amend ...
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Reversible Turing tarpits?

This question is about whether there are there any known reversible Turing tarpits, where "reversible" means in the sense of Axelsen and Glück, and "tarpit" is a much more informal concept (and might ...
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density of undeciability

Consider a function $f:\mathbb{N} \to \{0,1\}$ whose is defined in terms of some universal Turing machine $U$. If $U$ halts when given $x$ as input then $f(x)=1$, otherwise $f(x)=0$. Clearly the ...
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Exact catchup point between SGH and FGH of ordinals?

An ordinal hierarchy is a way to assign a function $f_{\alpha} : \mathbb{N} \rightarrow \mathbb{N}$ to each (recursive) ordinal $\alpha$. The corresponding functions are expected to be monotone and ...
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is determining an unknown CFL from intersection of two CFLs decidable?

this problem was asked over a week ago on cs.se now with 7v and no answers so far, ie still "open". (there are many somewhat related problems/near variants re CFLs but its not obvious how to reduce it ...
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Proof of undecidability not by reduction from the halting problem

The usual way of proving undecidability is by reduction from a RE-complete problem such as the halting problem, validity in first order logic, satisfiability of Diophantine equations, etc. It is ...
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Turing-complete computation models on graphs

There are many Turing complete computation models and new ones are devised all the time. I am looking for Turing-complete computation models based on graphs?
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What is the simplest computational model for which the emptiness problem is undecidable?

What is the simplest computational model for which the emptiness problem is undecidable? Emptiness problem for a computational model (e.g. finite state automaton, alternating pushdown automaton, ...
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Problems with efficient solution except for a small fraction of inputs

The halting problem for Turing machines is perhaps the canonical undecidable set. Nevertheless, we prove that there is an algorithm deciding almost all instances of it. The halting problem is ...
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How can I compute knots?

Is there a documented way to compute knots? (circumferences embedded in a 3-dimensional Euclidean space). I mean, a datatype to represent them, and an algorithm to determine if two instances of the ...