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Somewhere I read something like "a hypercomputer rotating around a rotating black hole" would have some esoteric properties e.g. would produce other answers than other hypercomputers and other computing. Is there any support for this, do I remember incorrectly, or is this claim known to be nonsense?

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    $\begingroup$ You may get a more receptive audience at cs.stackexchange.com. The question may be a bit too braod, vague, or non-researchy for this site.... $\endgroup$ – usul Jan 21 '13 at 3:23
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    $\begingroup$ Lmgtfy. $\endgroup$ – Kaveh Jan 21 '13 at 4:34
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There are actually sort-of-researchy things one can say about rotating black holes. Namely it is known that sufficiently quick rotation produces time-like simple closed curves, leading to interesting questions about how to model time-travel paradoxes in complexity theory; see Aaronson and Watrous, "Closed Timelike Curves Make Quantum and Classical Computing Equivalent", arXiv:0808.2669

I have no particular opinion about combining hypercomputers with time travel that does not generalize to my opinion about hypercomputers in general, so probably it's best if I just point you to the one paper I could find that both cites Aaronson and Watrous and discusses hypercomputers:

Hajnal Andréka, István Németi, and Gergely Székely, "Closed Timelike Curves in Relativistic Computation", Parallel Processing Letters, 2012 and arXiv:1105.0047

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  • $\begingroup$ If you give me a problem that is exponential and I jump into a black hole and calculate for 10 years and then come back to you and show you the result but your time was only 10 seconds, then you have an interesting situation do you agree? Its a trick with time. $\endgroup$ – Niklas R. May 7 '16 at 7:40

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