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I have found some video courses like this one but they are all in russian or other languages I don't understand. I'll like to know if anyone has come across lectures (courses) of this kind which are in english.

I am also aware that there are questions which are similar to this one on stackexchange e.g.this one, but I couldn't find any course of this kind among the answers given.

P.S: I'm interested in anything involving randomness in TCS as long as it is a full video course.

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    $\begingroup$ Have a look at these: 1, 2, 3, 4. Also check and Robert Sedgewick's coursera courses. $\endgroup$ – Kaveh Feb 2 '14 at 5:20
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. But I'm specifically interested in video lectures. $\endgroup$ – Obinna Okechukwu Feb 2 '14 at 6:19
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    $\begingroup$ "randomness in TCS" is not specific enough. do you mean randomized algorithms? or derandomization and pseudorandomness? or the Kolmogorov complexity approach to randomness? $\endgroup$ – Sasho Nikolov Feb 2 '14 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ Anything involving randomness in TCS as long as it is a full video course. I have been trying to learn as much as I can about various tools from probability used in TCS, that's why I am interested in this. $\endgroup$ – Obinna Okechukwu Feb 2 '14 at 17:39
  • $\begingroup$ Lectures 6-9 from Tim's Algorithms p. 1 course on Corsera is about randomized algorithms: quicksort, selection, and Karger's mincut. It's an intro course, so it's all relatively basic. There are more advanced and more specialized courses, and you can find lecture notes for them. But there aren't many videos available for more advanced courses. $\endgroup$ – Sasho Nikolov Feb 2 '14 at 18:18
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leading expert on the topic Wigderson at IAS has recently been lecturing/researching/survey/overviewing this important/emerging/crosscutting area.

written notes similar to/overlapping these lectures:

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    $\begingroup$ I have actually watched most of Avi Wigderson's lectures online. Anyways, I am more interested in a full course and not various isolated lectures. Thanks anyways. $\endgroup$ – Obinna Okechukwu Feb 2 '14 at 17:41
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    $\begingroup$ afaik "randomness" is considered a highly significant paradigm in CS (as above) but not generally regarded/organized as an entirely separate course... $\endgroup$ – vzn Feb 2 '14 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ I have found a couple of courses (no videos) on randomized algorithms for example and other topics. The Russian video in my answer is also a course on this subject. $\endgroup$ – Obinna Okechukwu Feb 2 '14 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ ok of course it would be helpful to be more complete in citing all this bkg info in your original question so responses can be tailored. as the Wigderson perspective(s) highlights, randomized algorithms are just one (major) element of the study of randomness in CS. $\endgroup$ – vzn Feb 2 '14 at 18:07
  • $\begingroup$ I have found a video course on what I was looking for. It's listed in my answer. Thanks anyways! $\endgroup$ – Obinna Okechukwu Feb 13 '14 at 23:22
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Well, there're these two courses I'm currently taking

half CS, half physics https://www.coursera.org/course/randomness

Statistical Mechanics: Algorithms and Computations https://www.coursera.org/course/smac

I have really hight hopes for the latter! Hope I've helped.

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I have found a video course which is almost exactly what I was looking for. It's a course titled "Using Randomness in Computer Science"

It can be found here: http://www.dailymotion.com/playlists/user/NicolasSchabanel/2

Each lecture is in a different playlist. Only the first lecture is missing, but I found it here: http://www.youtube.com/user/nicolas2222222222/videos

This note by Oded Goldreich is also very useful: http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~oded/PDF/rnd.pdf

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