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In some problem I need to find the zeroes (multiple real solutions) of some functions in 1D and 2D. I wonder which is the best parallel algorithm for this, which can provide the highest accuracy and its optimal from the computational point of view.

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closed as off topic by Suresh Venkat Oct 17 '11 at 16:08

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    $\begingroup$ Crossposted on math.SE: math.stackexchange.com/q/73334/3330 $\endgroup$ – Raphael Oct 17 '11 at 13:23
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    $\begingroup$ I think Raphael's point is that we don't usually permit cross posting. If you feel after a few days that you haven't received a satisfactory answer from there, you can reopen the question here by flagging, and explaining in the question why the answers you received aren't to the mark. OR you should remove the question from math.Se and flag this post with a note to that effect. Simultaneous crossposting merely causes duplication and discussion fragmentation. Closing now. $\endgroup$ – Suresh Venkat Oct 17 '11 at 16:08
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    $\begingroup$ I only wanted to document the crosspost (as I feel the OP should have done) but your point stands, Suresh. $\endgroup$ – Raphael Oct 17 '11 at 17:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Suresh, I think between limited options that we have for closing a post, "not-constructive" is a better option than "off-topic" as the close reason for simultaneous cross postings (off-topic gives a -1 vote to the question and makes it harder to keep track of these question for later reopening). $\endgroup$ – Kaveh Oct 18 '11 at 13:16
  • $\begingroup$ you can close the question whenever you want to $\endgroup$ – Open the way Oct 18 '11 at 14:40