Questions tagged [computability]

Computability theory a.k.a. recursion theory.

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3
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0answers
128 views

What is the largest complexity class that a non-Turing complete proof assitant, like Coq, can achieve? [duplicate]

Given that all functions in Coq will terminate, it cannot cover the entire $RE$. So what is the class it can achieve? Is it $R$?
28
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6answers
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Maximum computational power of a C implementation

If we go by the book (or any other version of the language specification if you prefer), how much computational power can a C implementation have? Note that “C implementation” has a technical meaning:...
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6answers
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What's the simplest noncontroversial 2-state universal Turing machine?

I'm wanting to encode a simple Turing machine in the rules of a card game. I'd like to make it a universal Turing machine in order to prove Turing completeness. So far I've created a game state ...
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1answer
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Succinct complete problems in DTIME(EXP(EXP(…)))

I understand complete problems for $EXPTIME$ or $NEXPTIME$ formulated as succinct instances of e.g. $NP$-complete problems such as $3-SAT$. On input $x$, one efficiently computes a circuit $R(x)$ such ...
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0answers
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Formal definition of Turing Completeness [closed]

Wikipedia states: In computability theory, a system of data-manipulation rules […] is said to be Turing complete or computationally universal if it can be used to simulate any single-taped Turing ...
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1answer
190 views

Is there any relationship of hardness between the two problems?

Assuming F(x,y,D) is a function, and we can evaluate it in polynomial time with input x, y and D. Consider the problem P1: With D as input, computes $(x^*,y^*)=argmax_{(x,y)}F(x,y|D)$ where x and y ...
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0answers
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Notions of Computability at Higher Type III

I've recently found a very nice survey paper called "Notions of Computability at Higher Type" by John R. Longley. The paper says it is part of a 3-part series, with the 3rd concerning non-extensional ...
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1answer
119 views

Are there any known problems that require potential nontermination to solve? [closed]

Apart from problems that specifically have to do with Turing machines, like "Simulate a Turing Machine with the given description", are there any problems that require Turing-complete potentially ...
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1answer
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Could you explain to me the reduction? [closed]

I am looking at the following solved exercise: I haven't really understood at the reduction the part that we construct for each number $a_i$ a package of measurement $(\frac{4}{A}a_i, 5,3)$. Why do ...
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1answer
365 views

Can all mathematical operations be encoded with a Turing Complete language? [closed]

In High School Computing I was taught the Structured Program Theorem - that you could implement any mathematical operation using: Sequence Selection Iteration After completing a Computer Science ...
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4answers
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Finding a finite model

I know that the question "does a first order formula $\phi$ have a model" is undecidable in general. Could anyone give me a link or a book which give the answer for finite models. If I have a first ...
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1answer
135 views

What is the relationship between tail recursion with other recursions? [closed]

I'm rather confused by the recursion theory. From the link, the recursion theory was formed by Dedekind, Gödel and some other famous mathematicians. There are the following types of recursion. But ...
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0answers
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Are there analogues of Specker sequences for other complexity classes?

Consider the standard definition of computable real numbers: a real number $r$ is computable just in case $r$ is the limit of a sequence $(a_i)_{i \in \mathbb{N}}$ such that (1) the function $i \...
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0answers
148 views

The complexity of the disjoint union of a sequence of complete problems

Suppose that for every $k \in \mathbb{N}$ the decision problem $A_k$ is hard for $\mathsf{N}k\text{-}\mathsf{ExpTime}$. What is the complexity of their disjoint union $A = \{ (k,x) \mid k\in \mathbb{...
34
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4answers
898 views

Correspondence between complexity classes and logic

I took a class once on Computability and Logic. The material included a correlation between complexity / computability classes (R, RE, co-RE, P, NP, Logspace, ...) and Logics (Predicate calculus, ...
3
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1answer
118 views

What is the simplest universal unidimensional interaction net system?

The Interaction Combinators are possibly the simplest multidimensional system of interaction nets that is Turing-complete. What about interaction nets with only 2 ports - 1 principal, 1 auxiliary? ...
32
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5answers
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Programming languages for efficient computation

It is impossible to write a programming language that allows all machines that halt on all inputs and no others. However, it seems to be easy to define such a programming language for any standard ...
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1answer
202 views

In regards to the tautologies of a polynomially-bounded propositional proof system

In the book 'Logical Foundations of Proof Complexity', co-authored by Stephen Cook, the following definition is given: A proof-system $F$ is said to be polynomially-bounded if there is a polynomial p(...
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5answers
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Can a computer simulate itself as part of a simulated world?

Let's say you build a computer that will calculate the state of all atoms in the Universe at certain future point in time. Because the Universe is, by definition, everything that exists (and anything ...
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7answers
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Applicability of Church-Turing thesis to interactive models of computation

Paul Wegner and Dina Goldin have for over a decade been publishing papers and books arguing primarily that the Church-Turing thesis is often misrepresented in the CS Theory community and elsewhere. ...
7
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1answer
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A word anticorrespondence problem

A problem instance is a finite list of 4-tuples $(\alpha_1, u_1, v_1, \beta_1), ..., (\alpha_N, u_N, v_N, \beta_N)$, where $\alpha_i, \beta_i \in X$ come from a finite set, and each $u_i,v_i \in A^*$ ...
13
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3answers
830 views

What are natural examples of non-relativizable proofs?

As I understand it, a proof that P=NP or P≠NP would need to be non-relativizable (as in recursion theory oracles). Virtually all proofs seem to be relativizable, though. What are good examples of ...
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2answers
245 views

Are there any open problems concerning decidability? [duplicate]

I am learning computability theory. I am just interested to know some famous problems (Formally languages) whose decidability is in question.
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2answers
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Are there any propositional proof systems which are not Cook-Reckhow proof systems?

An abstract proof system is a polynomial time function $f$ whose range is equal to the set of tautologies. If $\tau$ is a tautology, then an $f$-proof of $\tau$ is any value $\pi$ such that $f(\pi) =...
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0answers
124 views

A variant of the tiling problem

A classic tiling problem with Wang tiles has the form: Given $n$ tiles $T=\{t_1,...,t_n\}$ and some constraints $H,V\subseteq T\times T$, is there a way to tile a $w\times h$ rectangular grid with $...
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Applications of “Seemingly Impossible Functional Programs”

What are some practical applications (existing or potential) for Martin Escardo's "Seemingly Impossible Functional Programs"? For starters, here are a few from: Alex Simpson’s Lazy functional ...
2
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1answer
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Proof software for Primitive Recursive Arithmetic

Primitive Recursive Arithmetic is a critical foundational system in mathematics at large, and all the more so in areas studying constructive reasoning and/or computability such as Theoretical Computer ...
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1answer
170 views

Can interaction combinators implement any interaction net efficiently?

It is widely known that interaction combinators can implement any interaction net. My question is, can they do so efficiently? I.e., is it possible to prove that there is no interaction net system ...
39
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9answers
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What is the difference between non-determinism and randomness?

I recently heard this - "A non-deterministic machine is not the same as a probabilistic machine. In crude terms, a non-deterministic machine is a probabilistic machine in which probabilities for ...
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1answer
218 views

Polynomial-time reductions between undecidable languages

The Turing degree $\mathbf{0}'$ is defined as all languages Turing-equivalent to the halting problem. In fact any recursively enumerable language is polynomial-time reducible to the halting problem. ...
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0answers
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Proof for multiplicative dominance of universal probability distribution

I'm looking for the proof of the Leonid Levin theorem that states that the universal prior distribution function multiplicatively dominates all other functions of its type. The original article is ...
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1answer
1k views

Computing the DAG of a program given source code or AST

I've seen many papers on scheduling components or tasks once a DAG for the program is known, either by user-input or by domain restriction (i.e. all cross shaped 5-pt stencil codes have a known DAG). ...
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5answers
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(False?) proof for computability of a function?

Consider $f(n)$, a function that returns 1 iff $n$ zeros appear consecutively in $\pi$. Now someone gave me a proof that $f(n)$ is computable: Either for all n, $0^n$ appears in $\pi$, or there is ...
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1answer
394 views

An example where smallest normal lambda term is not fastest

Let the $size$ of $\lambda$-terms be defined as follows: $size(x) = 1$, $size(λx.t) = size(t) + 1$, $size(t s) = size(t) + size(s) + 1$. Let the complexity of a $\lambda$-term $t$ be defined as the ...
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0answers
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Simple version of Wang's tessellation problem

I'm reading about Wang's tessellation problem and the text mentions a simpler version: If we consider a finite set of tiles $W_{n}=\{w_{1},...,w_{n}\}$ where $n$ is bounded then the claim is that now ...
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The halting problem in computational models weaker than Turing machines

What are the main results and/or literature on the (self) halting problem for other machines than Turing machines? Alternatively, what would be the right keywords or tags to search for it. I am ...
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2answers
2k views

What functions can System F not compute?

In this wikipedia article on Turing Completeness it states that: The untyped lambda calculus is Turing complete, but many typed lambda calculi, including System F, are not. The value of typed ...
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1answer
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What are the limits of computation in this universe?

I understand that Turing completeness requires unbounded memory and unbounded time. However there is a finite amount of atoms in this service thus making memory bounded. For example even though $\pi$...
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2answers
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What is the “nearest” problem to the Collatz conjecture that has been successfully resolved?

I am interested in the "nearest" (and "most complex") problem to the Collatz conjecture that has been successfully solved (which Erdos famously said "mathematics is not yet ripe for such problems"). ...
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2answers
216 views

Information-theoretic Diffie-Hellman

The following non-standard description of Diffie-Hellman is entirely my own, by which I mean that I came up with it having not read about it anywhere else beforehand. In Diffie-Hellman Alice and Bob ...
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4answers
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Is there a non Turing-complete model of computation whose halting problem is undecidable?

I cannot think of any such model, maybe some form of typed lambda calculus? some elementary cellular automaton? This would almost disprove Wolfram's "Principle of Computational Equivalence": ...
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0answers
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Is it possible a recursive compression algorithm based on L-systems or a variant?

According to the Internet, there's a way to get an L-system's rules by it's string, unfortunately I can't read it because it's behind a paywall. Question: If that paper is right, is it possible to ...
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1answer
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Undecidable Single Programs [closed]

So the halting problem basically states that there cannot exist any finite length algorithm for automatically verifying if other finite length algorithms terminate. But suppose I start listing out ...
7
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1answer
187 views

Formalized priority argument

A priority argument, an important proof technique in recursion theory, was introduced by Friedberg and Muchnik, to solve Post's Problem, i.e., the existence of two r.e. sets that do not Turing reduce ...
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2answers
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Proof for Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable using reductions

I am looking for a proof that Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable using a reduction from another uncomputable problem. The common proof is a formalization of Berry's paradox rather than a reduction, ...
2
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1answer
134 views

Turing degree of Solomonoff semi-measure

We define the Solomonoff semi-measure $m$ on finite strings $x$ by $$m(x) = \sum_{p: U(p) = x} 2^{-l(p)},$$ where $U$ is a universal prefix Turing machine, $U(p) = x$ means $U$ outputs $x$ on input $...
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2answers
1k views

To what extent can an algorithm predict the time complexity an arbitrary input program?

The Halting problem states that it is impossible to write a program that can determine if another program halts, for all possible input programs. I can, however, certainly write a program that can ...
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4answers
1k views

Is there a generalization of the GO game that is known to be Turing complete?

Is there a generalization of the GO game that is known to be Turing complete? If no, do you have some suggestions about reasonable (generalization) rules that can be used to try to prove that it is ...
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0answers
143 views

What can you do with a moving knife besides cutting a cake?

In the fair cake-cutting, two different computational models are used: A discrete model, in which the algorithm issues queries to the players and proceeds according to their replies; A continuous ...
3
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1answer
93 views

Results about computability power or limitations of shared read/write registers

I want to know more results about the computability power or limitations of shared $\texttt{read/write}$ registers/objects in distributed/concurrent computing theory. Two typical examples are: [1]. ...

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