We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

3

As others have pointed out, "model of computation" is an open-ended concept that can hardly be captured by a single defintion. A similar example in traditional mathematics is "space". However, this should not prevent us from giving precise definitions of "model of computation". As our understanding and motivations change, so will the definitions. And keep ...


4

I think that different mathematical models of computation capture different aspects of physical reality. Similar to models of solid state physics (say), these mathematical models may be largely incomparable. Think of analog computers, where the model may not even be described with discrete math. When it comes to automata and formal languages (of finite words ...


-3

https://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~ooste110/talks/NMC53.pdf this reference says MoC’s are structured in a category (in fact, a 2-category).


6

Based on a fairly cursory inspection of their paper, IBM is clearly aware of the spatial locality. They seem to in fact have taken spatial locality into account when designing their simulation. They use spatial locality to put the states of local systems into primary memory, and record the whole state in secondary memory. If you can't contain the whole state ...


2

The scaled down version of $\mathsf{PH}$ versus $\mathsf{PP}$ is $\mathsf{AC}^0$ versus $MAJ \circ \mathsf{AC}^0$, and we know that for the latter there is an exponential separation. Of course, this separation doesn't propagate exponentially up, but you could take this as philosophical evidence that $\mathsf{PH}$ is different enough from $\mathsf{PP}$ that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included