22

I think it is very helpful to point out if and where previous results are erroneous. I've done this myself (more times than I would have liked to). My style is to state the correct result, and in immediate proximity (above, below, footnote) a remark to the effect that "In the conference version [citation], Theorem X incorrectly stated that...".


19

First and foremost, stay on time. Usually, at conferences you are supposed to talk for a very limited amount of time, e.g. 25 minutes including 5 for questions. In such slot you will not be able to go deep into the technical details. You should have a more "marketing" approach to presenting a paper. You have to convince the attendants about: what your ...


12

I think the same standards apply, regardless of whether it's your 1st or 100th publication. If you think you've found a mistake in a published paper, a common courtesy is to first contact the paper's authors for a clarification, as Noam suggested in the comments. If the authors confirm that it's indeed a mistake, you can indicate that in the paper (cite it ...


8

I don't think there is any TCS conference that would be a fast track to a permanent job. STOC, FOCS, and SODA are the most competitive conferences, and papers in those will certainly look very good in your CV, but just one paper won't help that much with the career. To really stand out, you will need something more than that (say, lots of papers in STOC, ...


7

I am an author of a paper that is to appear in the WG 2015 proceedings. As far as I know, they have not appeared yet, which is indeed quite strange. Early February I emailed the chair (Ernst Mayr) to ask for the page numbers of my paper; they were not yet known at that time. The chair informed me that he encountered a big technical problem when producing ...


6

The POPL-colocated PLMW, which you mentioned, certainly provides travel support for undergraduate as well as graduate students. I personally know undergrads who've been supported. If you're interested in PL research (of any kind, not just POPL-like research) I encourage you to apply. The ACM student research contest (of which the ICFP SRC is a part) ...


5

You may want to refer to the editorials introducing recent special issues: SODA 2016: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3230647 SODA 2017: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3319426 They both start with essentially the same paragraph: We are delighted to present a Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Algorithms, containing full versions of seven ...


5

I agree with the others that the answer to your first question is definitely "yes", and would like to add another online resource where you can have an idea of the difference in "prestige": it's the (in)famous CORE conference ranking, which ranks CS conferences (not just TCS) on a grade scale A$^\ast$, A, B, C, with A$^\ast$ being the top tier conferences. ...


4

In Italy we don't have "fast tracks to permanent jobs" (especially in Academia), but we have a complicated algorithm that ranks CS conferences (we have to take it into account for the National Scientific Qualification): http://www.consorzio-cini.it/gii-grin-scie-rating.html According to this one, STOC, FOCS and SODA are in Class 1 (top class), CCC and ...


3

For the past three years, SOCG has included a satellite event called the Young Researchers Forum, which is a venue for early students and other newcomers to computational geometry to present preliminary or ongoing research. It's not meant specifically for undergraduates, but undergrads are certainly welcome. Most major theory conferences have been able to ...


3

The best option might be the FCRC, which combines lots of famous and interesting theoretical conferences and others. I didn't see the policy for supporting undergraduate students, but I believe they would waive your registration fee should you write to ask (maybe they need volunteers?). Especially, as you mentioned POPL, PLDI suits a little more for ...


3

This list of upcoming cs events is very practical, in my opinion.


3

This list of conferences by Tom Friedetzky and Daniel Paulusma is another nice resource.


2

The International Conference on Database Theory (ICDT) publishes its proceedings in the LIPIcs series. It is essentially the European-based database theory conference, with PODS (not open-access) being the American-based one. There is a more detailed list of open-access venues in data management research and other neighboring areas on this page. (Disclaimer:...


2

Miki Hermann maintains such a list, and keeps it very much up-to-date: http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/Labo/Miki.Hermann/conf.html


2

The Discrete Analysis Journal, which works as a peer-reviewed overlay for arXiv, includes among its topics "theoretical computer science" (and, for instance, computational complexity. From their website: Discrete Analysis is an arXiv overlay journal. This means that while we have a conventional editorial board and refereeing process, we do not host the ...


2

I emailed the PC and received the following answer: "Title page" means a page that contains only the title and abstract.


1

(alas) there is a basic mismatch between the two areas: undergraduate and research, because most serious research happens at least at the graduate level. however consider the following (which are not (T)CS focused but encompass it): National Conference on Undergraduate Research / 2014 CS presentations / Final program pdf has many undergraduate (T)CS ...


1

Although this doesn't seem to be widely advertised, and it's not clear to me whether or not SIAM policy makes these open access forever [can someone clarify?], many of the SIAM conferences currently have freely available official proceedings: SODA ALENEX ANALCO UPDATE: a3nm contacted SIAM directly about the SODA proceedings, and they said they did not ...


1

Links to Combinatorial Conferences Theory Conference


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