22

I think it is very helpful to point out if and where previous results are erroneous. I've done this myself (more times than I would have liked to). My style is to state the correct result, and in immediate proximity (above, below, footnote) a remark to the effect that "In the conference version [citation], Theorem X incorrectly stated that...".


17

The process of journal reviewing shakes out bugs. Conference reviewers tend not to look at papers with a fine-tooth comb; the program committee process gives them too many papers to review in too short a time to do that. The main things that one should get out of a conference review are whether there are obvious flaws (these are rare) and whether the results ...


12

I think the same standards apply, regardless of whether it's your 1st or 100th publication. If you think you've found a mistake in a published paper, a common courtesy is to first contact the paper's authors for a clarification, as Noam suggested in the comments. If the authors confirm that it's indeed a mistake, you can indicate that in the paper (cite it ...


11

Fun with Algorithms! Although it is a conference not a journal that you might looking for, among other things several NP-hardness results about (combinatorial) games are published here, including this one. However this is a triennial conference (except for 2014, where the last conference was in 2012), so if you want to publish it soon then there might be ...


8

I don't think there is any TCS conference that would be a fast track to a permanent job. STOC, FOCS, and SODA are the most competitive conferences, and papers in those will certainly look very good in your CV, but just one paper won't help that much with the career. To really stand out, you will need something more than that (say, lots of papers in STOC, ...


6

Apart from top conferences mentioned by @usul, I think Journal of the ACM (JACM) is a top journal in computer science, which also includes many excellent theoretical computer science papers. In addition, I read some papers published in Algorithmica. Also, just giving a reference, I find a link to some journals related to Discrete Mathematics (particularly ...


6

Put it on the arxiv. Yes, it is not refereed, but it does give you some limited visibility, and sooner or later, if it is interesting, it would get cited.


5

You may want to refer to the editorials introducing recent special issues: SODA 2016: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3230647 SODA 2017: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3319426 They both start with essentially the same paragraph: We are delighted to present a Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Algorithms, containing full versions of seven ...


5

I agree with the others that the answer to your first question is definitely "yes", and would like to add another online resource where you can have an idea of the difference in "prestige": it's the (in)famous CORE conference ranking, which ranks CS conferences (not just TCS) on a grade scale A$^\ast$, A, B, C, with A$^\ast$ being the top tier conferences. ...


4

In Italy we don't have "fast tracks to permanent jobs" (especially in Academia), but we have a complicated algorithm that ranks CS conferences (we have to take it into account for the National Scientific Qualification): http://www.consorzio-cini.it/gii-grin-scie-rating.html According to this one, STOC, FOCS and SODA are in Class 1 (top class), CCC and ...


2

The International Conference on Database Theory (ICDT) publishes its proceedings in the LIPIcs series. It is essentially the European-based database theory conference, with PODS (not open-access) being the American-based one. There is a more detailed list of open-access venues in data management research and other neighboring areas on this page. (Disclaimer:...


2

IPL (for Information Processing Letters) is a good place for publishing short papers.


2

Judging from their archive, it seems that since 1994 the Journal of the ACM is issued 6 times a year, so roughly every other month. Until 2006 it was published on odd months. From 2007 on, the schedule seems to be somewhat random, but there are still 6 issues a year (though sometimes one of them is published on the wrong year, as in 2009 and 2010).


2

The Discrete Analysis Journal, which works as a peer-reviewed overlay for arXiv, includes among its topics "theoretical computer science" (and, for instance, computational complexity. From their website: Discrete Analysis is an arXiv overlay journal. This means that while we have a conventional editorial board and refereeing process, we do not host the ...


1

Although this doesn't seem to be widely advertised, and it's not clear to me whether or not SIAM policy makes these open access forever [can someone clarify?], many of the SIAM conferences currently have freely available official proceedings: SODA ALENEX ANALCO UPDATE: a3nm contacted SIAM directly about the SODA proceedings, and they said they did not ...


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